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Rock look to assist food bank

1297290363585_AUTHOR_PHOTOBy Thomas Perry, The Daily Press (Timmins)

TIMMINS – In addition to filling the seats at the McIntyre Arena for Saturday night’s battle against the division-rival Cochrane Crunch, the Timmins Rock are hoping to help stock the shelves of the South Porcupine Food Bank.

Fans attending the second half of this weekend’s home-and-home series with the Crunch are being asked to bring non-perishable food items with them to the game.

Tracy Hautanen, game-day co-ordinator for the Rock, noted the sponsor for Saturday night’s game, McDougall Energy will have staff on hand to assist with the collection of the food and they will also assist with the delivery of the items collected to the food bank.

Richard Bouvier, president of the South Porcupine Food Bank, appreciates the effort the Rock are putting forth to help stock the shelves.

“We didn’t do too well at Christmas with our food donations,” he said.

“We didn’t get what we had expected, so, anything is welcome. We are into our reserves already and we are barely into January. Everything we receive, we give away to families and single people.”

What kinds of things is the food bank running low on?

“Pretty well everything,” Bouvier said.

“It doesn’t really matter. I would like to see a lot of canned vegetables.”

Demand on the services provided by the food bank gains a higher profile during the holidays, but Bouvier notes people need to eat year round.

“This week, we have served more than 125 people,” he said.

“It takes a lot of food to be able to give out to these people. The more we have, and the more different kinds of stuff we have, the better. In addition to being able to give out the basics, we can give out a little bit extra.”

The economy in the Timmins area is doing relatively well, but that has not slowed the demand for the services provided by the food bank.

“There are more and more people,” Bouvier said.

“I always think it is going to go down a little bit, but all of a sudden — bang — it goes right back up again.”

Bouvier is grateful for the community groups, like the Timmins Rock, coming to the assistance of the food bank during its time of need.